Plants in the Sahara Desert

Plants in the Sahara

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

On our tour of Morocco we spent a night in the Sahara Desert camping in a Berber tent. The next day our guide woke us early, before dawn. This was so we could slog our way to the top of a nearby sand dune to witness the sunrise over the desert. Looking to the east from our vantage point we could see the Algerian border some 30 km away, though the actual border was disputed territory at the time.

Perhaps something many of the others in the tour group didn’t notice were the beautiful patterns made by clumps of grass growing on the dunes. Set against the deep red sand and emphasised by the early morning sun’s rays, they made quite an impression on me. I just had to take a series of photos.

Over the years during our many travels I look out for birds to photograph so I can add them to my site called Trevor’s Birding. When the birds are not showing themselves I often turn my camera lens towards things more botanical, especially flowers. We have some spectacular flowers here in Australia so that makes it easier. Sadly, we didn’t see any flowers in the Sahara Desert. On the other hand, these photos of the grasses growing there sure made up for that lack.

I am not sure what the grasses were as my speciality is birds. I had enough trouble identifying them. Even my wife, who has a lot of expertise in Australian native plants (see her website here), had some trouble identifying plants in Morocco and Spain during our holiday.

You can access more articles about our tour by going to the side bar or the archives here.

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

Plants in the Sahara sunrise

 

One Response to “Plants in the Sahara Desert”

  1. […] I even noticed a small flock of them in the few trees near our campsite out in the desert. There was obviously enough food around to sustain a small population a considerable distance from houses. I find this is also true of this species here in Australia. I have seen quite large flocks – up to many dozens or more – quite some distance from human habitation, their preferred habitat.¬†The small flock I saw in the desert had the advantage¬†of plenty of grasses on and between the sand dunes nearby, as illustrated by these photos. […]

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